Sydney Harbour

//Sydney Harbour

Sydney Harbour

$79.95$99.95

See-through Print on clear PVC and Clear Acrylic.

Framed in Merbau Hardwood.

See these prints come alive when placed in the light. The natural sunlight then filters through the print and reflects much the same as does stained glass.

SizeMeasurements
SmallL 17 cm x H 12 cm x D 4 cm
MediumL 25 cm x H 17 cm x D 4 cm
LargeL 31 cm x H 25 cm x D 4 cm

 

 

 

 
SKU: Sydney Harbour Category:

Description

Sydney Harbour

 

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a steel through arch bridge across Sydney Harbour that carries rail, vehicular, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic between the Sydney central business district (CBD) and the North Shore. The dramatic view of the bridge, the harbour, and the nearby Sydney Opera House is an iconic image of Sydney and Australia. The bridge is nicknamed “The Coathanger” because of its arch-based design.[2][3]

Under the direction of Dr John Bradfield of the NSW Department of Public Works, the bridge was designed and built by British firm Dorman Long and Co Ltd of Middlesbrough and opened in 1932.[4][5] The bridge’s design was influenced by the Hell Gate Bridge in New York City.[6] It is the sixth longest spanning-arch bridge in the world and the tallest steel arch bridge, measuring 134 m (440 ft) from top to water level.[7] It was also the world’s widest long-span bridge, at 48.8 m (160 ft) wide, until construction of the new Port Mann Bridge in Vancouver was completed in 2012.[8][9]

The bridge was formally opened on Saturday, 19 March 1932.[39] Amongst those who attended and gave speeches were the state Governor, Sir Philip Game, and the Minister for Public Works, Lawrence Ennis. The Labor Premier of New South Wales, Jack Lang, was to open the bridge by cutting a ribbon at its southern end.[citation needed]

Francis de Groot declares the bridge open
However, just as Lang was about to cut the ribbon, a man in military uniform rode up on a horse, slashing the ribbon with his sword and opening the Sydney Harbour Bridge in the name of the people of New South Wales before the official ceremony began. He was promptly arrested.[40] The ribbon was hurriedly retied and Lang performed the official opening ceremony. After he did so, there was a 21-gun salute and an RAAF flypast. The intruder was identified as Francis de Groot. He was convicted of offensive behaviour and fined £5 after a psychiatric test proved he was sane, but this verdict was reversed on appeal. De Groot then successfully sued the Commissioner of Police for wrongful arrest and was awarded an undisclosed out of court settlement. De Groot was a member of a right-wing paramilitary group called the New Guard, opposed to Lang’s leftist policies and resentful of the fact that a member of the Royal Family had not been asked to open the bridge.[40] De Groot was not a member of the regular army but his uniform allowed him to blend in with the real cavalry. This incident was one of several involving Lang and the New Guard during that year.[citation needed]
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia.

 

This is the view from the Back of the Print.

 

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Additional information

WeightN/A
DimensionsN/A
Size - Windows

Large – L 31 cm x H 25 cm x D 4 cm, Medium – L 25 cm x H 17 cm x D 4 cm, Small – L 17 cm x H 12 cm x D 4 cm

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